WHEN TO GO ORGANIC

There’s plenty of evidence that pesticides have a negative impact on our environment and our health (including hormone disruption, cancer and brain toxicity). Fortunately, organic produce, free of pesticides and herbicides, is now easy to find in most grocery stores and at local farmers markets.  It may be a bit pricier, however, but we think you and your family are worth the extra bucks and it is another way of loving your body! If you’re on a tight budget, buying exclusively organic foods might not be realistic. Thankfully, there’s a solution! According to the Environmental Working Group, you can reduce your pesticide exposure by nearly 80% (wow!) simply by choosing organic for the 12 fruits and vegetables that contain the highest levels of pesticides, based on their tests.  They call these “The Dirty Dozen” 

The more we choose organic foods and demand environmentally safe, organic farming practices, the more the food industry will have to listen and respond (and prices should come down too). Vote for change with your fork! 

Did you know that organic dried fruit does NOT contain sulphur/sulphides? Most dried fruits use sulfur/sulphur to artificially preserve their color. Organic dried fruit goes through a natural drying process and no additives, colours or preservatives are used. Sulphur Dioxide is often found in conventional dried fruit and has been known to cause problems with individuals who have asthma, especially children. Sulphur Dioxide is prohibited in all organic production with the exception of wine. All organic dried fruit darkens naturally over time on the exterior due to the lack of chemical preservatives. That darkening lets you know it’s truly organic. Don’t worry; this natural darkening has no effect on taste, flavor, or healthfulness.

The Dirty Dozen (in order of contamination)

Apples

Celery

Sweet bell peppers

Peaches

Strawberries

Nectarines

Grapes

Spinach

Lettuce

Cucumbers

Blueberries

Potatoes

The Clean 15 (in order of least contamination)

Onions

Sweet Corn

Pineapples

Avocado

Cabbage

Sweet peas

Asparagus

Mangoes

Eggplant

Kiwi

Cantaloupe

Sweet potatoes

Grapefruit

Watermelon

Mushrooms

 

Sources: Janet and Greta Podleski & The Environmental Working Group, madeinnature.com, Scott Butler