Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon was the first World Marathon that I completed. I qualified for the Boston Marathon while running the Ottawa Marathon. This run is definitely high on my list of favourite runs. The support from the city and spectators is unbeatable!

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Training for your first Marathon

Written By Lindsay Borden

You’ve finished a 5km run and decided to tackle a 10km run. The typical runner will think, that wasn’t so bad, I’m going to try a half marathon. Really, a half marathon is only another 10km (plus 1). Around the first training run, you realize, “that’s another hour of running!” 

So how do you train for this 2+ hour run?

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Runner's Corner - Introduction to Lindsay Borden - "How I got hooked on running."

Lindsay Borden

Lindsay Borden

Growing up, I always enjoyed outdoor sports like skiing (water and snow), swimming, and windsurfing. However, I never really pushed myself to truly excel at these sports. I remember trying out for the Cross Country running team in high school (I say “trying out” even though I am pretty sure everyone made the team, because I don’t actually remember competing). During practices, I always found ways to cheat. When we did an out and back run, I turned back early. When we ran through the school instead of outside, I spent a few laps in the student council office snacking.

This all changed when I started running.

When I started running

When did you start running? This is a question all runners are asked. We can usually identify the exact moment we started running or the driving force behind it. Because let’s face it, there has to be something that gets us pushing ourselves to pound the pavement (or trail) day after day, destroying our knees, and tightening our muscles, regardless of the weather.

I started running with a friend at summer camp. She asked me to join her on a run off the camp’s grounds, had the patience to help me build my pace, and I thought she was pretty cool. Thinking back, I am not sure I would have the patience she had. I could barely run ten minutes without getting a metallic blood-like taste in my mouth. However, she persevered and by the end of two months, we were running 7km talking the whole time (every real runner knows that the way to measure how fit you are is by seeing how fast you can run while still maintaining a conversation).

After that summer, I joined a gym. Another member of the gym was checking out my speed on the treadmill to see if I would make a good running partner. We started running together and he suggested I sign up for a 10km race. My first race was the Sporting Life 10km. From there, I signed up for a half marathon following by a full marathon. After that, I was hooked.

I have since run in marathons across North America and have started running in Europe as well.

Around the same time I started running, I also started challenging myself personally. My determination physically transferred into my career. I set goals for myself and rarely did one thing at a time. I got into teaching at a time that was not easy to get into teaching, I started working on my Masters of Education while teaching and shortly after that applied to become a Vice Principal. At this time, I also got my real estate license.

Running teaches you to set achievable goals for yourself and just as you are about to reach those goals, you have already set new ones.  


Runner's Corner - Big Sur International Marathon

World Marathons - By Lindsay Borden

Big Sur International Marathon

Lindsay Borden

Lindsay Borden

The Big Sur Marathon is beautiful scenic run along Hwy 1 in California. Don’t expect to reach a personal best on this hilly run. Most runners will have cameras and be pulling them out for great photo opportunities throughout the race. The trick is ensuring your frequent stops aren’t putting you at risk of reaching the 6 hour time limit before you reach the finish!

Registration for the Big Sur International Marathon opens in mid July for two weeks. At the end of the two weeks there is a draw. Only 4500 participants are allowed to run in this event that takes place at the end of April.

Where to stay:

I initially booked a room at a hotel in Monterey (near the expo). Shortly before leaving for California, I got worried about how far the hotel in Monterey was from the finish. I didn’t want to have to worry about parking, traffic, etc., so I decided to look for another hotel within walking distance from the finish line. This lead me to the Carmel Mission Inn. The room was quiet and clean with a view the could not be beat. With a view of the finish line from the hotel balcony, my boyfriend could watch the run while doing work from the comfort of our balcony.

Carmel Mission Inn

Carmel Mission Inn

Where to eat:

Finding vegan and organic options in Carmel and Monterey was not as easy as I would have thought (especially for dinner). We were able to find the Whole Foods and got a meal, plus snack, from there. We also found an organic breakfast spot called The Wild Plum:http://thewildplumcafe.com/, and had a before race pasta dinner at Cafe Rustica in Carmel Valley: http://www.caferusticavillage.com/

Race Day

The race day starts bright and early (you might want to bring melatonin to ensure a good night’s sleep). Buses to the start begin shuttling runners between 3:30 am and 4:30 am for the 6:45 am start. Ideally you have an easy walk or drive to the buses that will drive runners South down Hwy 1 to Big Sur. At the starting area there are plenty of port-a-potties (I recommend getting in early) and music. The park is taped off to prevent people from squatting in the bushes (however there are some opportunities to do this early in the run).

At dawn, we were lined up in our heats to start the race. A drone flew overhead taking pictures of the runners.

At dawn, we were lined up in our heats to start the race. A drone flew overhead taking pictures of the runners.

The views for this race could not be beat! I suggest bringing along some Arnica, Bromelain, or even Tylenol to help your muscles and joints battle the hills.

The views for this race could not be beat! I suggest bringing along some Arnica, Bromelain, or even Tylenol to help your muscles and joints battle the hills.

The Bixby Creek Bridge is another beautiful view with a surprise at the end.

The Bixby Creek Bridge is another beautiful view with a surprise at the end.

Each year a pianist, Michael Matinez, baby grand for runners passing by.

Each year a pianist, Michael Matinez, baby grand for runners passing by.

Before you even get to the finish line (at around mile 23), there are strawberries at the aid station (and again at the finish lines). As someone who runs thinking of the smoothies she’ll have at the finish, there’s nothing better than some fresh fruit to keep you going (or at the end of the run).

Before you even get to the finish line (at around mile 23), there are strawberries at the aid station (and again at the finish lines). As someone who runs thinking of the smoothies she’ll have at the finish, there’s nothing better than some fresh fruit to keep you going (or at the end of the run).